AUGUST 2019

EIGHT DEADLY SINS
by Gary Irving

 

This August Gallery 903 features photographer and artist Gary Irving’s Eight Deadly Sins.  

Gary Irving is a multimedia artist with a studio located in Santa Cruz, CA who is known for his highly stylized narrative photo-composites. Irving uses Photoshop to combine subjects from different frames within a background to create a story in the manner of a painter. Starting with the concept, he photographs the subjects in his studio and then places them digitally into a background. Originally developed for a commissioned calendar project for the popular Santa Cruz Derby Girls, Irving has used this style on four other distinct series: Santa Cruz Skateboard Legends, Surf Apocalypse, Zombieland, and Dark Portraits.

Having grown up in a small Welsh town, Swansea, Irving moved to Santa Cruz in 1994 and has since established himself as one of the premiere visual artists working in digital medium in Central California. Originally interested in drawing and painting, Irving incorporated photography into his practice for source material and to document his work. Eventually, his interest in photography outgrew his love of paint and he immersed himself fully in the pursuit of mastering his technique. In order to make the most cohesive final composition, Irving has to light the subjects in such a way that they will fit together within the background without the viewer’s attention being drawn out of the scene to its construction.

AVARITIA GREED  Digital Print on Canvas; wood and resin frame; 36.5 x 20 x 5 inches   One of the many ways in which humans commit the sin of greed is the the production of wind farms. Wind farms are built in areas with high wind, which are also known to be areas that birds utilize for flying through and often focus on the ground looking for food. Thus the birds end up being killed. In fact, we don’t even have an accurate idea of just how many are killed, because predators like coyotes will clean up many found on the ground. This again leaves the ecosystem unbalanced. Additionally, there are studies now showing that bats are also being killed in these areas as the farms take from the air and they suffocate. The more energy we use, the more we want, and with the progression of the electronic age human greed for energy is being disregarded. We are producing energy at the price of nature.

AVARITIA GREED Digital Print on Canvas; wood and resin frame; 36.5 x 20 x 5 inches

One of the many ways in which humans commit the sin of greed is the the production of wind farms. Wind farms are built in areas with high wind, which are also known to be areas that birds utilize for flying through and often focus on the ground looking for food. Thus the birds end up being killed. In fact, we don’t even have an accurate idea of just how many are killed, because predators like coyotes will clean up many found on the ground. This again leaves the ecosystem unbalanced. Additionally, there are studies now showing that bats are also being killed in these areas as the farms take from the air and they suffocate. The more energy we use, the more we want, and with the progression of the electronic age human greed for energy is being disregarded. We are producing energy at the price of nature.

ARTIST STATEMENT

This series is an environmental statement intended to show the gravity we should be giving to cleaning up our actions and caring for our planet. In each photograph, Mother Nature is personified in the form of a woman. This is intended to symbolize her strength and beauty in a way with which the viewer can hopefully empathize. Each item between her hands represents the materialization of a particular sin, and is floating for a surrealistic portrayal of the idea that we never thought we would see the occurrences that we are in fact now seeing. Mother Nature cannot touch the item because she has nothing to do with humanity’s sinful acts against her, and she is stuck watching disappointingly as we destroy her Earth.

Frames

The frames took approximately 8 months of the two year project. They are individually handcrafted from wood and resin, with specific pieces molded and glued together to form each final piece. As all the molds fell apart through the process, these frames are one of a kind and can never be recreated. When building them to encompass each sin, I wanted to epitomize the depth of darkness that our sinful actions have caused Mother Nature.

 

JUNE 2019

 

Land, Water & Sky

by Neal Philpott

FURTHER UPSTREAM 38" x 54" / Oil

FURTHER UPSTREAM 38" x 54" / Oil

This June Gallery 903 features the artist Neal Philpott. Through his close study of nature Neal captures the beauty of the Pacific Northwest in vibrant palettes of oil paint.

SHOW STATEMENT

The ever-changing beauty of the Northwest fascinates me. Views ranging from the simple to the sweeping are just outside my door. I love how a passing slant of light can enliven an everyday scene, transforming it into something uplifting for a brief moment. It challenges me to attempt to capture it in the unruly material of oil paint.

The scenes I’m most often inspired to paint are landscape scenes in my rural neighborhood, water in all its vagaries, and grand vistas with remarkable skies. Although I’ve lived and painted here for more than30 years, I never run out of incredible views to paint.

Originally from Michigan, I studied painting at the Center for Creative Studies in Detroit. I have lived in theNorthwest since 1988 and currently paint full-time from my studio in Oregon City, Oregon.

COLLECTION

William’s Creek, oil on canvas, 66×100

William’s Creek, oil on canvas, 66×100

William’s Creek is a tributary to the Umpqua River in southern Oregon. This painting is from an image taken in the early light of day that somehow snuck through the trees to light up this clear pool in the woods.

My initial reaction to the scene was to want to sit there and just take it in. It was so beautiful and peaceful and really quite wonderful to behold. I really liked the effect the super-clear water had on the color of the stones and boulders. Of course, this is what also made it a real challenge to paint. This intimate view of a clear mountain stream demanded its large size.

Initially, I had chosen to paint a vertical piece from the left side, but after many months of debate I elected to do the whole scene. I arrived at 66×100 because I wanted it big to evoke in a viewer a similar response to mine. I put it on two canvases to facilitate moving it around.

The two 50×66 canvases were constructed with special attention being paid to where I folded the raw canvas over the corners to achieve the tightest possible fit between them. I also constructed a wall mount to facilitate painting.

Each step of my process became a lot more demanding due to the extreme size. I had long since forgotten what I learned from a painting completed earlier in my career that was 120×240. I persevered regardless and became enmeshed in the project for 6 weeks!

Hiking Out, oil on canvas, 32×66

Hiking Out, oil on canvas, 32×66

This is a view from the Washington side of the Columbia River looking east down the gorge from Hamilton Mountain. I was inspired to paint this because I liked how much distance could be seen and the elevation or vantage point from where I stood.

This view made for an interesting painting challenge too. All the color values were in the middle for the top two-thirds of the piece. All the darkest darks were in the foreground. I like this. It makes the viewer (me) want jump over the darks to get to the ‘back.’ There are three distinct bands to this piece, giving it a nice overall design.

I used phthalocyanine and ultramarine blues, manganese violet, raw umber and white for the majority of my mixtures. I worked hard at keeping the values balanced so that the banding worked.

The foreground forest is an example of controlled chaos. This is another time that I was after a certain look as opposed to trying to render every tree. The chaos was controlled by concise color mixing and application. I used Gamblin’s Indian Yellow to warm up the foreground greens to make them seem to be in the reflected light of a bright, yet cloudy day!

Further Upstream, oil on canvas, 38×54

Further Upstream, oil on canvas, 38×54

My inspiration for tackling such a complex view was purely to see if I could do it. I really enjoyed digging into the minutiae of all the details this view had to offer and simplifying them in oil paint.

The tube greens were from Winsor & Newton and Gamblin: sap green, viridian and permanent green light. I used those in combination with ultramarine and thalo blue mixed with various yellows to get the rest. The tricky part was keeping the color temperature on check because that was the way to differentiate between the different areas.

This oil painting is another one with lots of edges that needed attention. I enjoyed the differences each area had to offer. The water in the foreground is a good example of soft and hard edges coming together to make the whole scene. I showed considerable restraint in not putting in too many white reflections but rather putting in just the right amount for it to read as water.

Big Tree, oil on canvas, 36×66

Big Tree, oil on canvas, 36×66

I love trees, and the large oaks of the Pacific Northwest offer a great painting challenge. Big Tree is like a giant octopus with its many trunks, branches and twigs. I elected to reduce the number of small twigs to better reveal the multitude of trunks going off in dozens of directions. I think that using some artistic license helps to get across the grandness of this particular tree.

I painted the entire sky background first, letting it over lap the edges of the trunks and establish the negative space; my paint mixtures contain phthalocyanine blue, ultramarine blue and manganese violet in addition to white.

Next, I established the entire tree starting with the darkest areas first. These oil paint mixtures used most of the earth colors, and I leaned heavily on Utrecht’s Van Dyke brown. This particular color reads as a warm black and was the perfect choice to convey the heft and girth of these large branches.

I then worked through all the light colors and enjoyed glazing them to achieve varying levels of illumination afforded by the low angle of the winter sun.

There are great views to be had all over the Pacific Northwest. I’m fortunate to have this view portrayed in Basin Spring near my studio.

I referenced a lot of images before I selected this one to paint. Why? Partly because of the clouds, but primarily I was after a certain shade of blue for the sky that had a little red in it as opposed to cyan. I used manganese violet for the red, but also used cadmium red deep to get just a slight tinge of purpleness to the sky.

Spring colors, especially the light greens, are very intense. There are few occasions to use paint this bright and I found one. The light areas around the foreground trees have mixtures that are almost pure color out of the tube. Very rare for me! Gamblin’s oil color cadmium chartreuse, knocked down with a touch of raw umber and some nickel titanite yellow, fit the bill for this area.

Like many landscape artists, I start with what’s in back working to what’s in front. This is usually from top to bottom and from sky to foreground. The sky was one challenge, but the bigger one was how to portray all that information without rendering every tiny detail and ultimately killing my desire to paint it.

I relied on my process of premixing all the colors of a certain area, applying them with my palette knife and then manipulating them with both the knife and other brushes. This approach helps to keep it loose and abstract.

Hiking Out, oil on canvas, 32×66

Hiking Out, oil on canvas, 32×66

This is a view from the Washington side of the Columbia River looking east down the gorge from Hamilton Mountain. I was inspired to paint this because I liked how much distance could be seen and the elevation or vantage point from where I stood.

This view made for an interesting painting challenge too. All the color values were in the middle for the top two-thirds of the piece. All the darkest darks were in the foreground. I like this. It makes the viewer (me) want jump over the darks to get to the ‘back.’ There are three distinct bands to this piece, giving it a nice overall design.

I used phthalocyanine and ultramarine blues, manganese violet, raw umber and white for the majority of my mixtures. I worked hard at keeping the values balanced so that the banding worked.

The foreground forest is an example of controlled chaos. This is another time that I was after a certain look as opposed to trying to render every tree. The chaos was controlled by concise color mixing and application. I used Gamblin’s Indian Yellow to warm up the foreground greens to make them seem to be in the reflected light of a bright, yet cloudy day!

Solid Gold, oil on canvas, 20×40

Solid Gold, oil on canvas, 20×40

The inspiration for Solid Gold came from my gut reaction to seeing this huge golden hill jutting up from the Columbia River on the Washington State side. This side gets intense sun and consequently dries out first in the spring. The grass had long since died and the sun had washed all the color out of it. The intense ‘whiteness’ of the dried grass read as gold. The conifers seemed like they were plunked down in a random way across this hill. They reminded me of black chess pieces because there was so little differentiation in the value within each tree.

The painting challenge was mixing all the light colors and having them read as grass. I like Daniel Smith quinacridone gold for these mixtures because it seems more believable and less chalky than yellow ocher or cadmium yellows. I modified this essential mixture with raw umber and the occasional touch of blue or black to keep the chroma in check.

After I block in the initial colors, I usually glaze them to add some nuance to the tones of my paintings. This is especially true when the range of values is narrow, as in the case of Solid Gold.

Overall this was a fun piece to paint because it seemed ‘happy’ to me. It seems to promise fine weather with the intense blue sky. The cool respite of the shadows beckon during the hottest time of day, and the gold grass seems to invite inspection to confirm its goldenness.

Land and Water, oil on canvas, 20×40

Land and Water, oil on canvas, 20×40

The Columbia River offers many beautiful vistas for an artist, which makes selecting one a challenge. I selected this view because I was intrigued by the rail tunnels cutting through the basalt and the fact that I could see through them completely. The tunnels were like black holes that framed mini-landscapes when you looked through them.

The painting challenge was to depict the depth of the landscape using value, chroma and color. To do this, I had to pay particular attention to color mixing. The left side has the foothill mountains fading into the distance. I’ve found that mixtures for the forested areas are the most believable when manganese violet (which reads red) and raw umber were added to the essential blue and green mixtures. During this mixing stage on the palette, I added white or a dark to control value while constantly comparing it to the other colors.

The color of the water had many of the same oil paint mixtures. I adjusted the colors with white, and I feel I was especially successful with this group of blues in depicting the color and flow of the water.

The land part was interesting to paint because of the extreme value contrasts between the shadow areas under the trees and along the canyons. The painting challenge beyond the color mixing was to control the edges where the dark and light areas meet.

All in a Row, oil on canvas, 38×54

All in a Row, oil on canvas, 38×54

I tried to keep the shadowed area to the left thin and somewhat transparent. Mixtures were heaviest with phthalocyanine blue modified with ultramarine and manganese violet. Sometimes I used magenta as well.

The leafy trees in the middle ground were of several species, so I wanted to emphasize their differences by mixing separate green palettes for each tree. Highlights were used to portray the shiny and waxy look of these riverine trees. I think this was a transition area for the light coming through, where the light still reflected the blue of morning on the back trees and reached full warmth on the center tree. Beneath the trees were several rocks all in a row, which gives this painting its title.

The challenge here was not to overpaint the details in the shadow areas, but rather suggest nooks and crannies with the flip of the brush. Highlights were cadmium lemon and white layered over each other until I got the brightness I wanted. It seems the whites lose their punch when they dry, so I over-compensated for that as I went along.

The oil paint mixtures for the water were mixed on the palette and applied with the knife. I worked with the same blues I mentioned earlier, but I changed the proportions of my mixtures to achieve the look I was after. The coarser paint application lent itself well to making a convincing portrayal of the water.

The forefront had long wavy river grass. I did not over-detail this area because it was mostly in shadow. I mixed all the separate greens on the palette and applied them with a palette knife and further manipulated the oil paint with different brushes.

Descending Trail, oil on canvas, 26×40

Descending Trail, oil on canvas, 26×40

The inspiration for this oil painting was its direction. There’s always a sense of relief after having reached your destination and finally hiking down. Some may see this painting as a hike up, but the small glimpse you get at the right edge tells the tale. You’re looking down at the tops of the trees.

Since much of the scene has the same value, the painting challenge was to make the different surfaces read right. I accomplished this by adding things in and taking other things out so that the pictured elements helped define the scene. This is also the time I use glazes to unify an area’s color temperature. In this painting some of the foliage got blue glazes while others received yellow glazes. This helped define the plant species as well.

 

MAY 2019

 
CELEBRATION  42" X 42" / Mixed Media / Adrienne Wannamaker

CELEBRATION 42" X 42" / Mixed Media / Adrienne Wannamaker

ARTIST SHOWCASE

In May we will host our Artist’s Showcase featuring a mixture of abstract and traditional art by gallery artists. Come see the newest works at 903!

 OPENING: First Thursday, May 1, 2019
6:00-9:00 PM 


gallery903.com  | gallery903@gallery903.com | 503 248-0903

On display through May 31, 2019

 

APRIL 2019

 
TELL ME SOMETHING GOOD  48” X 48” / Mixed Media

TELL ME SOMETHING GOOD 48” X 48” / Mixed Media

 

NEW WORKS BY KRISTA HARRIS 

This April we are excited to feature artist Krista Harris. Her richly layered palette and sensually manipulated surfaces are a perfect complement to Spring.

Painting is a very physical and sensual process for me, beginning days or weeks before I ever make a mark. Stretching canvases, mixing new colors and mediums, searching for new tools and methods of working. Each step is as integral to the process as the application of paint and mark. Once the work begins I try to keep myself off-balance and my mind at bay for as long as possible. 

Risk and uncertainty are an artist’s friend, and once the work begins I try to keep the painting open to all possibilities, deviations and directions – where it’s outcome is not yet known and anything can happen. Getting things wrong is often more productive than getting things right. Getting lost has surprising outcomes. Working back and forth between organic and architectural elements, patterns and textures, colors that become saturated or atmospheric, tangles of marks that whisper or shout are laid down, discarded, rediscovered and reconsidered. The mystery keeps the work alive for me, and becomes a map of uncharted terrain."

 
– Krista Harris 

OPENING: First Thursday, April 4, 2019
6:00-9:00 PM 


gallery903.com  | gallery903@gallery903.com | 503 248-0903

On display through April 30, 2019

THIS JANUARY

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This January we are excited to present 30 Days with Ben Hucke. Over the course of 30 days hyperrealist artist Ben Hucke has captured a variety of subjects spanning people, places and things. 

Hucke discovered drawing after the age of 30. It all started with a pen, a piece of paper, with the single goal of just having fun drawing some of his favorite places and objects.

“Drawing has fulfilled my eagerness to accomplish and learn everyday with the same intensity I once felt as a professional BMX rider”.  “It is a very organic process which became a portal from professional athlete to artist”. “The technique of scribbling and layering with fine liner pens is an exciting process to watch come together over hundreds of hours”.

 

BEN HUCKE
OPENING: First Thursday, January 3, 2019
6:00-9:00 PM | 
Artist in Attendance

gallery903.com  | gallery903@gallery903.com | 503 248-0903
On display through January 31, 2019

 

JHENNA QUINN LEWIS INTERVIEW

 
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THE SONG WITHIN 14" x 11" / Oil

 

903: What Does Your Art Mean To You? 

JQL:
 I revived this from a woman the other day from an admirer. It touched me very much. It is the reason I paint these pieces. 
 

I have just seen your work while researching volcanoes online. A lovely moment of meditation for me, thank-you! I have to go to my world of working with children with autism, and I will hold the peace and purity of your work in my mind today.  Kathryn


In my exploration of these Pandora’s boxes I have wondered might treasures could or did they contain. I just had the second Pandora’s box photographed on Friday. It’s a lovely piece. I have titled it after this heartfelt message from this woman. It is titled “ The Song Within.” It would appear working with artistic children and what interaction I have had with it and those suffering from trauma that these boxes in someway represent us.

903: Tell Us About Your Process

JQL: I use quality materials of Belgium linen on supports. My palette is limited. I use black, white, a variation of yellow and a variation of a red. The bright cadmium colors are used at the end to highlight the birds. Anderson Zorn is credited with using a limited palette with these colors. It is amazing to see how many colors one can get from four tubes of paint. When I started to use this limited palette I realized it added a greater harmony to my work and in general my shows. I really liked the effect and cohesiveness that could be achieved. 

903: What's A Typical Day In The Studio 

JQL: I work 5 to 10 hours a day in the studio. I have found that I prefer natural light to paint at the easel. Summers are wonderful with the early light and long days. This is when I try to put in as many hours as possible. I am a dedicated artist and rarely do I not paint 6 days a week. I do find time to hike about 6 miles a day. I find it a much needed to break to be out in the forests near my studio. It allows me time to be in nature It’s very peaceful to hike along the rushing creek and the cedar groves with their scent is heavenly. It is a time to reflect and meditate.

THIS DECEMBER

VARIATIONS ON A THEME

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Oil Painter Jhenna Quinn Lewis is renown for painting Asian-inspired still lifes. Contained within her compositions are carefully chosen objects and songbirds. Jhenna's studio is filled with antique Asian bowls, tea cups, old boxes and natural treasures. Her shelves contain an entire collection of branches, leaves, acorns and stones acquired on her daily hikes in the Pacific Northwest.

"I adhere to simplicity. I find the negative space used in my compositions integral to the meditative feeling they impart. The negative space holds an atmospheric feeling that is achieved through transparent and opaque glazing techniques resulting in an aura of muted dusky evening light." 

Her latest show for 903 is titled Variations on a Theme. For this collection Lewis chose to explore the possibilities of using the same elements in each composition, while varying the backgrounds and placement of objects. The frames chosen are identical – furthering the idea of unity and creating a ribbon-like atmosphere. The pieces are intended to be viewed as a grouping in harmony. 

Visit the entire collection First Thursday December 6 through December 30, 2018.
 


OPENING
First Thursday December 6, 2018
6:00 - 9:00 pm
Artist in Attendance

On display through December 30, 2018
.

 

CAROLYN COLE INTERVIEW

 
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903: You have a long showing history in both NY and the Pacific Northwest. Can you give us a brief trip through your career?

I graduated from Portland State University with a degree in Painting in 1977. My work was included in four art museum exhibits within the first two years of my career: Two in the Portland Art Museum, one in Seattle Art Museum, and one in Tacoma Art Museum. In 1981 I moved to New York City. I spent ten years there painting and doing sculpture. The work grew and changed along with my surroundings. It was a stimulating area and my work thrived in New York.

I relocated to Portland in 1991 and my paintings quickly changed. Colors became more vibrant and intense. I was seeing the beauty of the Northwest with fresh eyes after all those years away. This series, started in Portland, has consumed my time for 25 years. I have explored it relentlessly, seldom running out of ideas and new palettes to challenge my mind. My career blossomed with these paintings. Art galleries in many areas of the country have shown my work for the past 20 years.

903: Your work pops with color. How does color influence you? How do you choose your palettes? 

Color plays an important role in describing the emotional value and mood of each painting. I begin by mixing a new palette of colors. Usually, I see something in nature or on the street, or perhaps a movie or a book. Whatever stimulates me and gets me excited is valuable and can be used for a palette.

After much paint mixing, I start working on the canvas with those colors. As I go, new colors will be mixed and added. Each must relate to the other colors in some way. Changes come and go. Sometimes the completed painting reflects the beginning inspiration, but it often takes a different direction during its creation. Whichever happens, I work until I love it.

903: What's next for you in the studio? 

I’m nearly finished painting a commissioned work with a blue palette. Once that is done, I am excited to start a new red 4’x4’ painting. I have all the colors in my mind, just need to mix the palette to get going!

THIS NOVEMBER

Introducing
CAROYLN COLE

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Carolyn Cole finds her voice within the rich traditions of abstraction and creates a cohesive body of work that translates into a language of intense color, sumptuous textures, and organic compositions. Color plays an important role in describing the emotional value and mood of each work. Her forms are instinctively achieved through the process of applying multiple layers of pigment and textured surfaces, layer upon layer, to complete her unique voice.

An honors graduate of Portland State University in 1977, her work has been exhibited all over the United States, including the Seattle and Portland Art Museums. She spent ten years as an artist in New York City, where she exhibited extensively before settling back in the Northwest.
 
Her paintings are included in numerous private and public collections including Vice President Al Gore, Gordon Seigel, president of Crate & Barrel, former Presidential Chief of Staff John Podesta, Disney Productions, Zale Corporation, IBM Corporation, Kaiser Permanente, RNM Properties, Salton, Inc., TRW Corporation,  American Express, Campbell Soup and the Heinz Corporation.


OPENING
First Thursday November 1, 2018
6:00 - 9:00 pm
Artist in Attendance

On display through November 30, 2018
.

 

THIS JUNE/JULY

BENEATH THE SURFACE

BENEATH THE SURFACE

BENEATH THE SURFACE

NEW WORK BY ARTIST CHUCK GUMPERT


It's human nature to look for subject matter within an abstract piece, but to love an abstract one must view it with the heart. I believe in the importance of looking beneath the surface to find the real truth and meaning. My joy is the experimental freedom of mixed media to create evocative compositions and layered surfaces which can elicit a variety of interpretations and emotions from each viewer.

– Chuck Gumpert 

"Here is my secret. It is very simple: It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."

— Le Petit Prince by Antoine de Saint Exupéry

ARTIST CHUCK GUMPERT
OPENING: First Thursday, June 7, 2018
6:00-9:00 PM

Artist in Attendance

gallery903.com  | gallery903@gallery903.com | 503 248-0903
On display through July 31, 2018

IN APRIL

Welcome New Artist Rachel Warner 

JAPANESE EARTH SONG 32" X 27" / Oil

JAPANESE EARTH SONG 32" X 27" / Oil

Rachel Warner is the fifth generation of her family to grow up in the ski town of Whitefish, Montana. As a teen she was moved to Havre, Montana which is a blue collar town with a colorful history located between the Chippewa-Cree and Assiniboine Indian reservations. This experience has had a profound impact on Rachel’s interest in Native American customs and spiritual philosophies.

It was during her time enrolled at the Flathead Valley Community College that Rachel had the opportunity to study Renaissance Art History in the northern cities of Italy under the instruction of professor John G. Rawlings. Because of this life expanding education, the artist continues to stay connected with European art, culture and Italian oil painting history. 

In 2000, Rachel completed her B.F.A. at Montana State University in Billings and began her coast to coast career in fine art shortly after graduation.

Twilight Reverie 20" X 77" / Oil

Twilight Reverie 20" X 77" / Oil

Rachel is inspired by many of the great oil colorists throughout American and European art history but her greatest artistic influence is the California- Montana painter, Russell Chatham. With over twenty years of study and refinement, Rachel considers herself  amongst some of the most serious American Tonalist artists working today and a lifetime apprentice of Russell Chatham.

Rachel was recently honored as one of the important painters of Glacier Park in the show and documentary, ‘A Timeless Legacy, Women Artists of Glacier National Park’. The documentary led to speaking at the National Plein Air Convention and Expo in Tucson, Arizona in 2015. Rachel has over two decades of auction records and shows  her masterworks in some of the finest collections in the world, namely; Craig Barrett, Retired Ceo of Intel, Alice Walton of Walmart, Hollis Shaw of Google, Allan Roth of Sun Opta, David Berman, retired President of Capital Records, and many others. Rachel is currently exhibiting in a small, select group of galleries while working on private commissions in her Montana studio.

NEW ARTIST RACHEL WARNER
OPENING: First Thursday, April 5, 2018
6:00-9:00PM | 
Artist in Attendance